Brisingr – Christopher Paolini

Title: Brisingr
Author: Christopher Paolini
ISBN: 9780375826726
Pages: 763
Release Date: September 20, 2008
Publisher: Alfred A. Knopf
Genre: Teen, Fantasy
Rating: 4 out of 5

From Amazon.com:

Following the colossal battle against the Empire’s warriors on the Burning Plains, Eragon and his dragon, Saphira, have narrowly escaped with their lives. Still there is more at hand for the Rider and his dragon, as Eragon finds himself bound by a tangle of promises he may not be able to keep.

First is Eragon’s oath to his cousin Roran: to help rescue Roran’s beloved, Katrina, from King Galbatorix’s clutches. But Eragon owes his loyalty to others, too. The Varden are in desperate need of his talents and strength—as are the elves and dwarves. When unrest claims the rebels and danger strikes from every corner, Eragon must make choices— choices that take him across the Empire and beyond, choices that may lead to unimagined sacrifice.

Eragon is the greatest hope to rid the land of tyranny. Can this once-simple farm boy unite the rebel forces and defeat the king?

I’ve read and enjoyed the first two books in Christopher Paolini’s Inheritance Cycle, though I wasn’t dying to read the third book, Brisingr, when it came out last year. Still, I knew I wanted to read it, so I made sure to buy it for my e-book reader before leaving for Oxford.

First, the good: Paolini continues the tradition he began in Eragon and Eldest with an intricate storyline and well-developed characters. Most of the people in the book are ones we’ve met before, so they are already well-established, for the most part. It’s nice to revisit more of these characters, and Paolini did a great job in building suspense. Eragon himself is older and wiser in this novel – he makes fewer rash decisions, and you can really see how much he has grown up. Paolini also revealed just enough information in this book to make it satisfying, but there are enough questions left to fill up a fourth and final book. Additionally, I appreciated how Paolini actually departed from the cliché fantasy stories a bit in this novel.

Now, the not so good: parts of Brisingr is told from the point of view of Roran, Eragon’s cousin. While he is an interesting character, the book really lost my interest at those parts and I ended up skimming heavily in sections. Additionally, Paolini seemed to embellish in descriptions a little too much – it got trying after awhile. Also, there are those clichés I mention, though they are less employed in this novel than they are in the first two books in the series.

On the whole, I really enjoyed reading Brisingr. It was a nice escape, and Paolini has definitely whetted my appetite for the final novel in the Inheritance Cycle.

Comments

  1. I didn’t like Roran’s bits too. I’m rereading the Cycle, am in Eldest now. Thanks for the review, reminds me that I have to finish the series fast

  2. I didn’t like Roran’s bits too. I’m rereading the Cycle, am in Eldest now. Thanks for the review, reminds me that I have to finish the series fast

  3. There’s a 4th? My goodness. I started Eragon, and I enjoyed it for a while, but as you said, the descriptions went on forever. Sometimes it worked, but other times I felt like he was reaching.

  4. There’s a 4th? My goodness. I started Eragon, and I enjoyed it for a while, but as you said, the descriptions went on forever. Sometimes it worked, but other times I felt like he was reaching.

  5. I don’t think this is my kind of book, but Vance might like it.

  6. I don’t think this is my kind of book, but Vance might like it.

  7. My twins have read the entire series and loved it!

  8. My twins have read the entire series and loved it!

  9. I still need to read Eldest. It’s still sitting on my shelf and I still need to pick this latest one up. I have a lot of catching up to do for the fourth one.

  10. I still need to read Eldest. It’s still sitting on my shelf and I still need to pick this latest one up. I have a lot of catching up to do for the fourth one.

  11. There were only supposed to be 3, but the last one got so long they split it up. I think had something to do with publishing deadlines too. It was out like a year after it was supposed to be.

    I share your opinion. I liked parts, but other parts seemed to drag on forever. I read it right when it came out, but I had to stop and reread Eldest because I was lost. Glad you liked most of it! 🙂

  12. There were only supposed to be 3, but the last one got so long they split it up. I think had something to do with publishing deadlines too. It was out like a year after it was supposed to be.

    I share your opinion. I liked parts, but other parts seemed to drag on forever. I read it right when it came out, but I had to stop and reread Eldest because I was lost. Glad you liked most of it! 🙂

  13. I didn’t love the first two books enough to read on this one. Like you, I thought there was too much “cliché fantasy.” Glad to know that he is maturing as an author. If he starts over on another series or writes a stand-alone, I may give him another try.

  14. I didn’t love the first two books enough to read on this one. Like you, I thought there was too much “cliché fantasy.” Glad to know that he is maturing as an author. If he starts over on another series or writes a stand-alone, I may give him another try.

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