Morning and Evening Talk – Naguib Mahfouz

Title: Morning and Evening Talk
Author: Naguib Mahfouz
ISBN: 9780307455062
Pages: 208
Release Date: March 10, 2009
Publisher: Anchor
Genre: Multicultural Fiction, Historical Fiction
Review: Originally posted at Curled Up With a Good Book
Rating: 3 out of 5

Morning and Evening Talk is a novel (of sorts) about Egypt, stretching from the late 1700s to the 1980s. It follows three different families that live within Cairo, chronicling their lives through five generations. These three families are related, their histories intertwined.

One must ask, then, how can Mahfouz cover so much time in such a short book? After all, Morning and Evening Talk is fewer than 200 pages. The answer to that is that the book isn’t really a novel at all; instead, it is a series of biographical entries. It reads almost like an encyclopedia, briefly chronicling an entire life within a page or two, and it is organized in alphabetical order. As a result, it is completely disjointed, making it difficult to maintain the illusion of any type of storyline. The reader reads biography after biography, vaguely recalling names from previous entries. The fact that many people have the same or similar names makes it that much more confusing. As a result, it’s difficult to keep track of what is going on without taking notes on each character, which makes the book an extremely frustrating read.

According to the translator’s note, Mahfouz used the character sketches as a device to remind the reader of medieval Arabic texts in which entire lives were boiled down to a few sentences. If this is indeed the case, then Mahfouz achieved his purpose. Though there is little emotion involved in these entries, the author manages to portray changes in Egyptian society and culture over this span of time effectively. It’s a social commentary just as much as it is a history.

One thing that would be useful to have before reading Morning and Evening Talk is a firm grasp of Egyptian history. Mahfouz often refers to events in Egyptian history – it’s one of the few ways the reader knows when the person they are reading about lived. Though there is a glossary in the back of the book which includes major Egyptian events, it’s helpful to have a working knowledge of Egypt’s past before embarking on the journey that is Morning and Evening Talk.

While Morning and Evening Talk is definitely an interesting and unique look at Egyptian history and social customs, it’s better to have read at least one of Mahfouz’s other books before this one. Other books by Mahfouz would likely give a reader a greater appreciation of this, his final work before his death. While well-written with interesting insight into Egyptian culture, this book is a tedious read unless you are interested in experimental types of literature.

Thank you to Curled Up With a Good Book for sending me this book to review.

Comments

  1. I’ve only read one novel by Mahfouz, Autumn Quail. I wonder about authors’ last works sometimes being pushed into publication when they were not as complete as the author would have wanted. This sounds good for someone already familiar with the history, as you said.

  2. I’ve only read one novel by Mahfouz, Autumn Quail. I wonder about authors’ last works sometimes being pushed into publication when they were not as complete as the author would have wanted. This sounds good for someone already familiar with the history, as you said.

  3. Humm. I’m on the fence — I’m intrigued by the concept but I’m not familiar with the author’s work and I’m not sure the biographical sketches would work me.

  4. Humm. I’m on the fence — I’m intrigued by the concept but I’m not familiar with the author’s work and I’m not sure the biographical sketches would work me.

  5. To echo Beth: hmmmmmmm. Weirdly, this book sounds really intriguing to me. I don’t really know that much about Egyptian history post-Alexander the Great, but I would love to see how the author pulled this format together. I might check it out. Thanks!

  6. To echo Beth: hmmmmmmm. Weirdly, this book sounds really intriguing to me. I don’t really know that much about Egyptian history post-Alexander the Great, but I would love to see how the author pulled this format together. I might check it out. Thanks!

  7. I have no grasp of Egyptian history, I don’t think I would like to read this one. Coming from OT-09 blog. You forgot to enter your posts on to Mr. Linky there. I saw the link in the comments!

  8. I have no grasp of Egyptian history, I don’t think I would like to read this one. Coming from OT-09 blog. You forgot to enter your posts on to Mr. Linky there. I saw the link in the comments!

  9. Hello from a fellow Orbis Terrarum Challenge reader! I’d like to read something by Mahfouz soon, and this actually sounds as interesting in some ways as his more famous novels (I too am intrigued by the format you described). Thanks for the review!

  10. Hello from a fellow Orbis Terrarum Challenge reader! I’d like to read something by Mahfouz soon, and this actually sounds as interesting in some ways as his more famous novels (I too am intrigued by the format you described). Thanks for the review!

  11. I read the trilogy that he wrote – the CAiro trilogy and it was beautiful.. you should give it a shot sometime.. (or have you already read it?).. I loved the details and the descriptions! It was wonderful!!

  12. I read the trilogy that he wrote – the CAiro trilogy and it was beautiful.. you should give it a shot sometime.. (or have you already read it?).. I loved the details and the descriptions! It was wonderful!!

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