The Glass Painter’s Daughter – Rachel Hore

Title: The Glass Painter’s Daughter
Author: Rachel Hore
ISBN: 9781847391407
Pages: 400
Release Date: April 6, 2009
Publisher: Pocket Books UK
Genre: Women’s Fiction
Source: Publisher
Rating: 4 out of 5

Summary:

Fran Morrison is returning home after a long absence.  A falling out with her father led her to a life of traveling, playing the tuba with orchestras around Europe.  She turned her back on the family glassmaking business, Minster Glass, along with her father and his assistant, Zac.

Now she’s back in light of her father’s illness and isn’t sure what she should be doing.  In her discussions with those who knew her father, Fran stumbles upon a mystery involving a stained glass window her family’s business made for the church in the 1800’s.  As she becomes more and more immersed in the stained glass window, Fran begins making a home for herself, though she doesn’t know where she really belongs.

Review:

The Glass Painter’s Daughter is a fascinating look at the glass making business.  Rachel Hore goes into a lot of detail trying to make the process seem real and she creates a vivid picture for the reader.  Making stained glass is an incredibly intricate process, and Hore describes it very well.  It made the book completely captivating, as the reader is immersed in creating, preserving, and restoring stained glass.

There are two narrators in The Glass Painter’s Daughter, though it is Fran’s story.  Fran’s a great character, though very complex.  She has been through a lot with her father and has a lot of questions about her mother.  Through her research into the stained glass window, she gets to know the other narrator, Laura Brownlow.  Fran finds healing as she immerses herself deeper and deeper into Laura’s story.

I can’t say I found Laura’s story, set in the 1800’s as captivating as Fran’s.  Laura’s narration doesn’t take up nearly as much time as Fran’s, which was a good thing for me.  I’m not sure why I didn’t connect with Laura; all I know is that I heavily skimmed the sections that she narrated.  However, according to the Amazon.co.uk reviews, not many people agree with me, so you may enjoy Laura’s section much more than I did.

Rachel Hore writes very well about relationships and complex emotional issues in The Glass Painter’s Daughter.  The reader becomes very involved in Fran’s life, hoping that she will work out her issues and repair her relationship with her father.  It’s an enjoyable read, and I hope to read more of Hore’s novels in the future.

Comments

  1. This one sounds very interesting. Probably a good discussion book too!

  2. This one sounds very interesting. Probably a good discussion book too!

  3. I agree books with this kind of themes make a good book club discussion..Nice review

  4. I agree books with this kind of themes make a good book club discussion..Nice review

  5. The stained glass process combined with relationships does sound really good.

  6. The stained glass process combined with relationships does sound really good.

  7. I hate when one narrator’s story is so much weaker than another’s. I have to say, I’m also getting a bit sick of this title formula “The (Profession)’s (Relation, usually female).

  8. I hate when one narrator’s story is so much weaker than another’s. I have to say, I’m also getting a bit sick of this title formula “The (Profession)’s (Relation, usually female).

  9. Interesting that there is a book about glass blowing. Fascinating topic. Thanks for the review.

  10. Interesting that there is a book about glass blowing. Fascinating topic. Thanks for the review.

  11. This sounds like something I wouldn’t mind checking out. Thanks for the review!

  12. This sounds like something I wouldn’t mind checking out. Thanks for the review!

  13. Since I grew up in the glass capital of the world (or so they claim!) anything that has to do with glass interests me. I wonder which story I’ll like better?

  14. Since I grew up in the glass capital of the world (or so they claim!) anything that has to do with glass interests me. I wonder which story I’ll like better?

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