A Wrinkle in Time: The Dark Thing

“What could there be about a shadow that was so terrible that she knew that there had never been before or ever would be again anything that would chill her with a fear that was beyond shuddering, beyond crying or screaming, beyond the possibility of comfort?”

- A Wrinkle in Time, 50th Anniversary Commemorative Edition

The Dark Thing.  Just its name makes one shudder.  But what it actually is?  That is beyond imagining.

The Dark Thing is pure evil.  It’s a world without books, without the pleasures of reading, without the warmth of the sun.  It’s a world without love or joy, without hope.  Can you imagine?

I think that The Dark Thing is one of the scariest characters in all of literature because it is complete, unadulterated evil.  There is no room for anything except hate and anger.  But still, despite the fear that The Black Thing puts in us, there are people who fight.  Artists, authors, leaders – people who bring justice to and put beauty in the world.  People who fight to express themselves, though they may be different.  Through A Wrinkle in Time, Madeleine L’Engle is telling us that, in order to fight evil, we must pursue our passions.

It’s a beautiful message, especially at a time when the world is facing an economic crisis and wars are raging.  It’s enough to make you wonder how much influence The Black Thing has over our world right now.  But, even in the darkest times, we must think of little Meg Murry. Meg, who was made fun of at school and had been underestimated all her life.  This girl fights to save her father and her brother from evil, and she does it using the only weapon she has: love.

Fifty years after it was written, that message is still so important.  The best weapon against evil, against the Dark Thing, was Meg’s ability to love.  That made all the difference.

Please visit The Wrinkle in Time Facebook page for more information on the 50th Anniversary Edition of the book and this blog tour.

Comments

  1. This was my younger brother’s favorite book ever when he was a kid. I wonder if it still is.

  2. This was my younger brother’s favorite book ever when he was a kid. I wonder if it still is.

  3. I really loved this book when I was a little girl, and your post has urged me pull it from my shelves so I can reread it!

  4. I really loved this book when I was a little girl, and your post has urged me pull it from my shelves so I can reread it!

  5. The Dark Thing sounds horrifying, and I can’t imagine a world that was dominated by it. I so need to read this book, if only to see the Dark Thing vanquished within the pages.

  6. The Dark Thing sounds horrifying, and I can’t imagine a world that was dominated by it. I so need to read this book, if only to see the Dark Thing vanquished within the pages.

  7. I agree. L’Engle explores these things further with the same characters in ‘A Wind Through the Door’ and ‘A Swiftly Tilting Planet’. Although I haven’t read either for some years, at the time I found ‘Wind’ to be one of the most amazing and chilling treatments of the problem of evil I had ever read. You inspire me to go back and read them again.

  8. I agree. L’Engle explores these things further with the same characters in ‘A Wind Through the Door’ and ‘A Swiftly Tilting Planet’. Although I haven’t read either for some years, at the time I found ‘Wind’ to be one of the most amazing and chilling treatments of the problem of evil I had ever read. You inspire me to go back and read them again.

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